Battery acid

I’ll admit I’d not given the “iconic Birmingham Battery Office” a thought, until I read this in the Birmingham Post about about calls for Sainsbury’s (the current owners) to do something to save it.

by genesis4626 on Flickr

by genesis4626 on Flickr

It looks like it’s about to fall down, and reading this account (and looking at the photos) of someone exploring it, it’s pretty clear that it’s dangerous too. Obviously a decision has to be made one way or the other.

It’s an interesting place historically, but is it worth saving architecturally? Finding photos of the building in anything other than a state of disrepair isn’t easy (although there are a lot of good derelict pictures) — is restoration worthwhile?

There’s obviously a wealth of tales to be told, one security guard says: “I looked through the old accident books and there were reports of horrific injuries, the most common were “kicked by a horse” and “fell on hot slag””. That sounds worthy of a novel…

5 comments for “Battery acid

  1. BB B
    8 April 2009 at 10:28 pm

    don't see what's 'iconic' about the place

    the Plough and Harrow was knocked down and that was iconic after a few pints

  2. genesis4626
    29 May 2009 at 12:20 am

    Hmm, nice use of my photo! Some of you should see this place from the inside. Quite amazing what has been left behind. This was only the admin block really, the actual metal battery factory is now the retail perk.

  3. r.trengrouse@tiscali.co.uk
    3 June 2009 at 3:00 pm

    I'm gutted by this. The old Birmingham Battery office block was an elegant and dignified building particularly contrasted to the cretinous tat the masquerades for architecture on the adjacent Battery Business Park. It always reminded me of a miniature St Pancras’s Station, as a child some forty years ago passing it was one of the highlights of my bus trips to town, particularly in the autumn when its Virginia creeper was flaming red.
    What were the sleepy heads in the City’s so called conservation group up to, this was an important building, it was their duty to protect it. Sainsburys had every opportunity to make it water tight and secure it, they chose not to. They never had any intention to include it in their new development and they are complete hypocrites to maintain that it was their intention to do so.
    Sainsburys are a hugely profitable and yet they insult the people of this City by their flagrant disregard for our heritage. If they had an ounce of decency they would rebuild this wonderful little building, well that’s another supermarket I won’t be shopping at in the future.

  4. mark
    19 June 2009 at 1:48 am

    Why knock it down, it was a lovely building. I should know as me and my family were the last people to live there, and had access to the whole building. Spooky at night though

  5. mark
    19 June 2009 at 3:48 am

    Why knock it down, it was a lovely building. I should know as me and my family were the last people to live there, and had access to the whole building. Spooky at night though

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